Dating a bipolar

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You have just shown a person who believes they aren't lovable that they can, in fact, be loved. You'll realize our laugh is contagious, and we always want you to feel the extremes with us. Sometimes we sit there in our lonesome, and we become a person a you won't recognize.We want to take that feeling all the way to the top of a mountain, and we want to feel your heart race with ours. Suddenly, we stop taking care of ourselves, and you will notice.Sometimes he is irrational.-I don’t want to sound manipulative , but I’ve treated him well, I have been easy to him , i love him,…are there any psychological tactics to make his uneeded anger disappear, his periods of detachment be milder, that he stops being so egoistic and also sees my needs.I´m sure there must be a psychological way to combat his inadequate attitudes due to his illness.( For example as giving confidence to a shy person, or making someone with phobias confront them).Its really hurtful going out with him because when he wants me he pressures till i fall again and after going out with him he emotionally disconnects as if he hated me.You either love someone or you don’t, but you cant go behind then tell them you don’t love them, have sex with them and later not call in a week.This is a concept of which is incredibly difficult to understand. Infatuation is definitely not something you can control.And when it comes to dealing with a person who has bipolar, it no doubt becomes a double standard of which would not fly when dating someone without a mental illness. You are either infatuated with someone or you are not. So yes, he can choose to love you one day, then choose not to the next.

But please don't give up on us if you know our heart is in the right place.

“You're like, bipolar,” my ex-boyfriend once told me. My moods were extreme, and at the good old age of 20, he wasn't much help in the situation due to his lack of understanding.

I would tell him to shut up and say he was rude for saying that. And although a lot of things began to make sense, it killed a part of my self-esteem. In the grand scheme of things, my ex and I both took part in the failure of our relationship.

Little did I know that, about six months later, I would also tell him he was right. Like many others with a psychological or mood disorder, I tend to feel shame and embarrassment in the fact. Bipolar II is described as “high episodes of euphoria and low episodes of depression, together known as hypomania.” But this is so much more than having a good or bad day here and there, and we are not “crazy.” With the help of my best friends and loved ones, I found the help I needed. I couldn't get over our past, and he never got to know or understand my illness.

When you're dating someone like me — someone with bipolar disorder — you have to be ready for a bumpy ride. You'll never be loved harder or shown more affection in your entire life.

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